"Evil"

Small-Group Session (1 of 2)

 

Set-Up

Before the session starts, the leader should set chairs in a circle, with a chalice and matches on a small table in the middle, or somewhere visible to participants.  Make sure the strips of paper for “Readings from the Common Bowl” are in the bowl.  Welcome people, and allow folks to settle before lighting the chalice.

 

Chalice Lighting and Opening Words

The group leader lights the chalice (or asks someone else to) and then, with the intent of creating sacred space, reads the following words:

What can we say of this evil?

What is its sound?

Does it go bump in the night,

Or some distant terror externalized on the big screen?

 

An outside force or something far more intimate,

Could it be here in you and me

As surely as the air we breathe that connects us to all who have ever been and will be?

 

This evil, as we praise the good and the beautiful,

Have we know it,

Even yet here,

Together?

 

Brief Check-In

Invite each person, in turn, to share a brief answer to the check-in question.  The check-in question is: “How is it with you now?  What has happened in your life since we last gathered?”

 

Readings from the common bowl

The leader passes around the bowl, with strips of paper that have quotes on them.  Invites each person to take one strip/quote out of the bowl. Then, invites each to read the quotes.  They don’t have to read in order, one right next to the last one.  But instead, invite them to allow some silence after every quote, and then to see if the quote they picked out of the bowl should go next or not.  (See additional page for quotes; these are the quotes that will be torn into separate strips, and put in the bowl before the meeting)

 

Focusing Question

After everyone has read the different statements, the leader asks the central question that will guide the session’s discussion: “Have you ever experienced something evil?  How would you describe your understanding and encounter?” 

 

First Round

Leader invites attendees to take no more than 2 minutes to share a response to the question.  Find a way to gently hold the group to the no-more-than-2-minute limit.  Also, let people know there’s no cross-talk to the responses: group-members don’t answer the statements people make.  One person speaks for oneself, then the next person does the same.  It’s not a conversation, so much as a series of statements. Again, each with some silence or space between. And, again, voices don’t need to go in order, with people sitting beside each other speaking—just as the spirit moves.

 

Silence

After hearing everyone’s statements, the leader invites the group to sit in silence for 2-3 minutes.  This is not time for them to plan what they’ll say.  It’s time to sit and be present, to let whatever comes up, come up.

 

Second round, reflections on what was heard, with additional thoughts

Whereas in the first round, attendees were encouraged to stick to their own thoughts, here in the second round, people can respond to some of what they heard.  Again, encourage brevity—whether a formal 2-minute limit is enforced or not, encourage the conversation to move from one place to another in the circle, not getting dragged down to one or two voices who speak at length.  It’s OK for people to respond to each other’s comments.

 

Likes and wishes

The leader asks for people to share, as they’re moved, what they liked about the session, and what they wish for next time, that they may or may not have experienced this time.

 

Closing Words & Extinguishing the Chalice

 

If remembering had the power to change behavior,

So let us remember.

 

If liberating had the power to shift the course of our future and the lives of our grandchildren,

So let the series of liberations begin within us and among us.

 

If truth could rouse a heart from apathy,

And story could cultivate compassion,

So let our hearts beat wildly and our beings find accountability each to the other.

 

Blessed Be.


Quotes for The Common Bowl

 

“I believe that ignorance is the root of all evil.
And that no one knows the truth.” 
― Molly Ivins

 

“Most of us have learned to be dispassionate about evil, to look it in the face and find, as often as not, our own grinning reflections with which we do not argue, but good is another matter. Few have stared at that long enough to accept that its face too is grotesque, that in us the good is something under construction. The modes of evil usually receive worthy expression. The modes of good have to be satisfied with a cliche or a smoothing down that will soften their real look.” 
― Flannery O'Connor

 

“I became convinced that noncooperation with evil is as much a moral obligation as is cooperation with good.” 
― Martin Luther King Jr.The Autobiography of Martin Luther King, Jr.

 

“The reason for evil in the world is that people are not able to tell their stories.” 
― C.G. Jung

 

“The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.” 
― Edmund Burke

 

 “Throughout our nervous history, we have constructed pyramidic towers of evil, ofttimes in the name of good. Our greed, fear and lasciviousness have enabled us to murder our poets, who are ourselves, to castigate our priests, who are ourselves. The lists of our subversions of the good stretch from before recorded history to this moment. We drop our eyes at the mention of the bloody, torturous Inquisition. Our shoulders sag at the thoughts of African slaves lying spoon-­fashion in the filthy hatches of slave-ships, and the subsequent auction blocks upon which were built great fortunes in our country. We turn our heads in bitter shame at the remembrance of Dachau and the other gas ovens, where millions of ourselves were murdered by millions of ourselves. As soon as we are reminded of our actions, more often than not we spend incredible energy trying to forget what we’ve just been reminded of.”

-Maya Angelou

 

“I object to violence because when it appears to do good, the good is only temporary; the evil it does is permanent.” 
― Mahatma GandhiThe Essential Gandhi: An Anthology of His Writings on His Life, Work, and Ideas

 

“Imaginary evil is romantic and varied; real evil is gloomy, monotonous, barren, boring. Imaginary good is boring; real good is always new, marvelous, intoxicating.” 
― Simone Weil

 

“It is very hard for evil to take hold of the unconsenting soul.” 
― Ursula K. Le GuinA Wizard of Earthsea

 

“So you see, Good and Evil have the same face; it all depends on when they cross the path of each individual human being.” 
― Paulo CoelhoThe Devil and Miss Prym